Wedding flowers – the origin

The first recorded use of wedding flowers can be attributed to the Greeks. Flowers and plants would be bundled together to form a garland wreath worn upon the head, much like the better-known Caesar’s laurels. It was considered a gift of nature, and thus extremely appropriate for a wedding. Traditionally, the Greek bridesmaids would be responsible for this honor.

The garland bouquet would often contain bulbs of garlic. This wasn’t to make the wedding smell like your grandmother’s kitchen, but instead to ward off any evil spirits that might see fit to intervene in the ceremony or curse their future together.

The tradition of wedding flowers remains to this day.

Wedding flowers aren’t just a Greek tradition. They’ve been adopted all around the world due to their natural beauty and wide appeal.

· Wedding flowers in Sweden – In Sweden, it was tradition for young girls to carry small bouquets of fragrant herbs down the aisle. The groom would also put thyme in his pockets. The reasons? Warding off any trolls that might decide a wedding was a perfect place to find a tasty snack.

· Wedding flowers in Germany – In Germany, the bride and groom both would hold candles that had flowers and ribbons tied to them.

· Wedding flowers in England – In England, it was tradition for the bride and her bridesmaids to proceed to the church together, led by a small girl who would sprinkle blossoms in their path to assure long life and happiness for the bride. The tradition of “flower girls” remains to this day.

Modern uses for wedding flowers

Wedding flowers have taken off in popularity to the point where you will be hard-pressed to find a wedding that doesn’t involve them in some way. Some of the new traditions include:

· The bouquet – This is perhaps, next to the bride herself, the centerpiece of the entire ceremony. A great deal of science has gone into developing a system of matching the blooms present in the bouquet with the season, with physical attributes of the bride, and with the location of the ceremony itself.
classic rose package  (2)
· The corsage – Another popular component of most modern dresses is the corsage. Worn about the wrist, it is usually designed to match the dress and bouquet.

· The boutonniere – This is a male tradition. Originally, flowers would be pushed through the buttonhole of a jacket, but nowadays it’s proper for the groom to have the boutonniere pinned to his left lapel. It’s also appropriate for it to match the bride’s corsage and bouquet.
Classic rose package
· Table centerpiece – Perfect for the reception ceremony, an extravagant centerpiece on each table leaves guests with nothing but fond memories. It’s now standard practice to include these in every reception.

Wedding flowers are steeped in history and will likely remain tradition for many years to come. I